Jump to content
matthew180

EU 6-pin A/V cable

Recommended Posts

It has come to my attention that the EU (PAL) 99/4A's have a 6-pin DIN output for the original audio/video vs. the 5-pin DIN used on the US motherboards. Does anyone know of a source for pre-made 6-pin A/V cables?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 6-pin output has Y, R-Y (Pr) and B-Y (Pb) signals. Y can be used as black/white output, but color needs serious encoding (see the color circuit in the Powetran Cortex schematics at powertrancortex.com. Modern TVs with component input (YPbPr) can display the color differential signal directly, and witout the rainbow color distortion seen on NTSC consoles :-)

To answer your question: there is no such thing as 6-pin A/V cables (for the TI).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, you probably have to make your own. I have an intermediate solution for my 99/4A, where I use the PAL antenna signal modulator, but not all the way. Instead of using the RF antenna output, I've tapped into the modulator and routed the color video and sound signals out separately. These I've then routed to the my monitor's composite video and sound inputs, respectively. Gives a better picture than RF, even if it's inferior to RGB.

 

Haven't tried this on any modern flat TV unit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the modification of the modulator is described at: http://www.ti99.com/ti99r1.htm

 

No, you probably have to make your own. I have an intermediate solution for my 99/4A, where I use the PAL antenna signal modulator, but not all the way. Instead of using the RF antenna output, I've tapped into the modulator and routed the color video and sound signals out separately. These I've then routed to the my monitor's composite video and sound inputs, respectively. Gives a better picture than RF, even if it's inferior to RGB.

 

Haven't tried this on any modern flat TV unit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting, so the EU version never has a composite output? I didn't realize that. Mostly I'm asking because I need to provide information for EU F18A users who will still need sound out of their 99/4A after installing the F18A. Is there a pinout of the 6-pin connector anywhere? I assume audio is still on its own pin?

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, I didn't even think to check Thierry's pages... Interesting note, I have an EU motherboard and the 5-pin DIN NTSC plug will not physically fit in the EU 6-pin DIN. I'll check again though, since it would be nice if the EU guys could just get the NTSC cable since the sound pin is the same as the NTSC version. Also on Thierry's page, the '6' is floating above the graphic like it is misplaced on the drawing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm, ok, that graphic contradicts Thierry's info. I guess I better start tracing the board I have to make sure. I also wonder if that 6-pin DIN is standard? I sure hope so!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is, or rather was. The DIN (Deutsche Institut für Normung) standards for these connectors have been replaced by the international IEC 60130-9.

But the old DIN 45322 specified the 6-pole connector used by TI in PAL versions of the 99/4A. The 5-pole version used by the NTSC consoles were within DIN 41524.

I have printouts of the schematics, so I can check there, but they are at home, so not until the evening.

 

Regarding the PAL modulator modification linked to above: It says on that page that the ground for the sound isn't used. The TV uses the video ground for both. It's actually so that the ground for the sound must not be used, or it will short out the video. No damage, but no video image either.

Edited by apersson850

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or, users can fit an internal amplifier inside their TI, like I have. The little 8-ohm speaker fits perfectly into the 'heat grille' just behind the cartridge port. Most amp kits can run on from around 3V to 14V so there's plenty of grunt in the TI for the power. (Tip: I removed the tin case surrounding the mother board).

 

The exact same kit is also available state-side for our US cousins. European cousins can get a list of European distributors from the Velleman (Belgium) site.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Friends :-)

it's Italian but you can translate it entering in the home page of the website before.

 

http://www.ti99iuc.i...ic.php?f=5&t=19

 

a ti99's user has described a v1.1 for the modification to the modulator originally from Sergio Vigano.

 

scroll down the thread, it could be interesting ;)

Edited by ti99userclub

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tip: I removed the tin case surrounding the mother board.
It's there to minimise issues with electromagnetic interference, so if you suddenly can't hear your radio any longer, you know why. The computer itself will probably work just as good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or, users can fit an internal amplifier inside their TI, like I have. The little 8-ohm speaker fits perfectly into the 'heat grille' just behind the cartridge port. Most amp kits can run on from around 3V to 14V so there's plenty of grunt in the TI for the power. (Tip: I removed the tin case surrounding the mother board).

 

 

Snap!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the modification of the modulator is described at: http://www.ti99.com/ti99r1.htm

 

Note that there are at least two versions of the PAL modulator box, and some of them don't have the ASTEC modulator shown in the modification - the modulator section is constructed from separate components on the main modulator PCB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At least in Europe the DIN Plugs 6 pin (6 polig) are widely avaiable:

http://www.conrad.at/ce/de/product/733336/DIN-STECKER-6-POLIG-0131-06/SHOP_AREA_17367&promotionareaSearchDetail=005

 

If you are interested in selling/manufactoring one for the f18a, i suggest making an adapter that looks like this:

http://www.jacob-computer.de/pic/artikel/8/5/856819.jpg

 

As far as I know you can make a dual mono audio (left = right) which features two rca connectors, or one female 3.5" phone plug.

People will either connect their amplifier (RCA), some pc speakers (Phone jack) or a flat TV (RCA or phone jack) to the f18a system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the modification of the modulator is described at: http://www.ti99.com/ti99r1.htm

Note that there are at least two versions of the PAL modulator box, and some of them don't have the ASTEC modulator shown in the modification - the modulator section is constructed from separate components on the main modulator PCB.

 

Yes i agree, at now i done this modification with success on about 20 modulators from German, England and Italy. All was the Iron Model of the Modulator.

on the Modulators Plastic model can't be done this modification, they was different.

From France there is the SCART Model that i use now on my LCD TV Monitor ;) and it's perfect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tip: I removed the tin case surrounding the mother board.
It's there to minimise issues with electromagnetic interference, so if you suddenly can't hear your radio any longer, you know why. The computer itself will probably work just as good.

 

No adverse effects here - planes still safely in the sky, satellites still orbiting, and no nuclear subs washed up on the beach ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the modification of the modulator is described at: http://www.ti99.com/ti99r1.htm

 

Note that there are at least two versions of the PAL modulator box, and some of them don't have the ASTEC modulator shown in the modification - the modulator section is constructed from separate components on the main modulator PCB.

 

Yep. In the UK (I presume all of Europe) the first modulator was a black and silver steel box, which was just totally AWFUL. Later systems had a plastic modulator which seemed to be much better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tip: I removed the tin case surrounding the mother board.
It's there to minimise issues with electromagnetic interference, so if you suddenly can't hear your radio any longer, you know why. The computer itself will probably work just as good.

 

No adverse effects here - planes still safely in the sky, satellites still orbiting, and no nuclear subs washed up on the beach ;)

 

Although that nice new shiny nuclear sub did run aground on a sand bank quite near you (geographically speaking) ...? ;-)

 

IIRC the tin shielding wasn't fitted at all on the QI boards, although they might have sprayed the inside of the case with shielding paint?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Texas Instruments ran through a lot of problems with FCC, when they were to launch the 99/4A. The computer was a beast when it came to radiated emissions.

That wasn't so much any issue in Europe at the time, but since many things in the US are pretty old-fashioned, AM radio was still in widespread use at that time. In Europe it had since long been replaced by FM, which is much more resistant to EMI (ElectroMagnetic Interference). But in the US, FCC had to test things according to much stricter rules, or AM reception wouldn't work.

 

This was the reason for the revised motherboard, with the tin shielding, the massive expansion box, with every card encased in cast metal and so on. The result was that the 99/4A is one of the quietest home computers there were. Appreciated by ham radio operators at the time.

 

But it was (too) expensive to manufacture, so the so called Quality Improved (rather Cost Reduced) consoles took other, cheaper measures to combat this problem.

 

Today, the requirements are similar in Europe and he US. The EMC directive, which became effective in 1995, imposes similar demands on electric and electronic equipment in Europe. That's not because of Europe going back to AM radio, but the density of electronic equipment in the society today is much higher.

 

Sorry if you didn't like this slightly irrelevant rant, but this happens to be my profession.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes i agree, at now i done this modification with success on about 20 modulators from German, England and Italy. All was the Iron Model of the Modulator.

on the Modulators Plastic model can't be done this modification, they was different.

From France there is the SCART Model that i use now on my LCD TV Monitor icon_wink.gif and it's perfect.

 

Bumping an old thread here due to attempting getting my newly aquired TI99/4a up and running, I have the plastic version of the PAL PHA 2036 modulator - is there a way this can be modded for composite video or am I out of luck?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

try here for find the tutorial for Plastic and Metal models:

 

post-24673-0-13198200-1519341402.png

 

 

BTW

OX i also wrote you a message about GameBase some months ago but never got an answer. Have you lost ?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...