Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Atari Rescue Group

I Am Guessing This Is A NES SMB3 Prototype

Recommended Posts

I was out with my brother the other day and wandered into this NES cartridge in a thrift store. The label caught my eye as it doesn't belong on this shape of cartridge, so I bought it. After I got it home and looked it over a bit I could see wires inside. Weighs 4.3 oz (121g). Can't find the screw remover I bought a few years ago so I've ordered another one.

 

I've got a NES compatible player somewhere so I'll plug it in pretty soon and check it out. I've never played Super Mario Bros. before so the suspense is unbearable.......

 

Best news is that my brother paid for it!

 

DSC00160.jpg

 

DSC00161.jpg

 

DSC00162.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a prototype, but an early import conversion to NES. There was an import game store in Atlanta in the early 90's that would do stuff like this...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a prototype, but an early import conversion to NES. There was an import game store in Atlanta in the early 90's that would do stuff like this...

I agree. It looks like they took the label off an actual import and placed it on the U.S. version. Probably due to the original label being destroyed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That makes no sense. Who would remove a label off a import cartridge just to place it on a US cartridge?

 

I can all but guarantee that what's shown here is sloppily done pirate. Super Mario Brothers 3 released in Japan almost to the day that the American Super Mario Brothers 2 was released. Then over the following year and a half before its official American release, many pirated copies of the Famicom version were sold over here.

 

Super Mario Brothers 3 was a very anticipated game that wasn't coming stateside fast enough for many gamers. So pirates naturally took advantage of it and gave thousands of American gamers a sneak preview of it.

Edited by Atariboy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That makes no sense. Who would remove a label off a import cartridge just to place it on a US cartridge?

 

I can all but guarantee that what's shown here is sloppily done pirate. Super Mario Brothers 3 released in Japan almost to the day that the American Super Mario Brothers 2 was released. Then over the following year and a half before its official American release, many pirated copies of the Famicom version were sold over here.

 

Super Mario Brothers 3 was a very anticipated game that wasn't coming stateside fast enough for many gamers. So pirates naturally took advantage of it and gave thousands of American gamers a sneak preview of it.

Like it couldn't happen? You know the world is full of idiots. If you look up an original import, it'll have the same exact label. Think about it, if someone had an import game lying around without a Famicom but had acquired a U.S. version of the game with no label, they may have decided to switch them for the heck of it since the U.S. version would be the one getting used. Not impossible.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't say that it was impossible that the situation you suggested could happen. I said that it didn't make any sense to do such a thing so it was highly unlikely that was the case with this cartridge.

 

Chances are that the counterfeit operation simply used the same labels that they were using to counterfeit Famicom cartridges for the Japanese marketplace and didn't see the need to go to any extra effort to make it more authentic looking.

 

And if there's any lingering doubts, look at his picture and read what he said about the insides. If this was a legitimate SMB3 cartridge for the American NES like you're suggesting, those wires shouldn't be there.

 

It's definitely a counterfeit.

Edited by Atariboy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the info. I'm still waiting on the tool to arrive so I can open it up. Makes sense that it likely is some sort of pirate job with that Famicom label on it. Whoever made it had to want to play it really bad with all of the wiring in there. I'll be able to plug it into a player over the weekend and when the tool arrives I will be posting some photos of the board.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the info. I'm still waiting on the tool to arrive so I can open it up. Makes sense that it likely is some sort of pirate job with that Famicom label on it. Whoever made it had to want to play it really bad with all of the wiring in there. I'll be able to plug it into a player over the weekend and when the tool arrives I will be posting some photos of the board.

Doesn't make sense why someone would do it. It's not like you can't find the game or it's expensive or something. I used to work a video store and we modified a flathead screwdriver to remove those screws. Only takes a couple minutes and what you end up with is a "U" shaped fork that'll grab those screws and take em right out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It makes sense that they bothered to do it when you consider the circumstances of this game.

 

It took a year and half to make it to North America, Nintendo was hyping it up during much of that time, the NES was by far the most popular console in North America, and Super Mario Brothers was its most popular series.. So it was a lucrative black market for the most highly anticipated NES release in history until Nintendo finally officially released it. Makes perfect sense to me.

 

Afterwards, it's hard to imagine there having been much money there to justify going to the bother with how labor intensive this looks to of been when the game was officially available for probably significantly less money than the premium that pirated copies like this had probably been going for before release.

Edited by Atariboy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is anybody else seeing the 'gyromite upgrade' as an awesome idea?

I think I'll have to do it with my Parodius Da! It's all in english anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't been able to play it yet, but I got it opened up and it is a pirate job. Looks like it was a lot of work to get the boards soldered together with all those wires! The surgeon used a piece of double sided tape on it--had to unstick that from the casing to extricate it.

 

I don't know what these things go for but anyone who is interested in it please send me an offer.

 

Here are some photos.

 

DSC00190.jpg

 

DSC00192.jpg

 

DSC00191.jpg

 

DSC00194.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, that's a lot of careful and delicate soldering.

 

What is the function of small chip on the NES connector board?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is the 10NES chip found on game PCB's to work with the Lockout chip inside the USA Nintendo. Most likely this is the work of an import shop. They just cut up a cheap NES game connector leaving the 10NES so that the game would play on a USA NES

 

Here is some detailed reading on the matter

 

http://www.allnes.com/howto_72pin.php

 

The 10NES chip was installed in every officially licensed NES cartridge released in the US. The console would check to make sure that the 10NES chip was in the game and functional before it would let the system boot up. Nintendo did this for two reasons - #1, they controlled the manufacture of these chips, and thus controlled licensing. #2, the chip was designed to thwart piracy, as the reverse-engineering required to bypass the lockout chip violated copyright law.
Edited by busterm
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, that looks like a Famicom PCB attached to an adapter. Telling from the picture, it has the MMC3A chip, so I think it's a genuine Famicom PCB. I did an image search and the pictures of the SMB3 PCB match the one shown inside that cart.

Edited by BrianC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...