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hueyjones70

Power supply for 400/800/1200/1050 etc

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I have recently had a plague of 9V AC power supply failures. I had three that were working a week ago to go bad, another has dropped off to 7.2 volts and will not power anything. When I started checking several that I had in storage, several of them were bad. I have a total of 7 bad power supplies out of the 10 I had on hand. Is there an alternative power supply that will run the 1050. I don't mind splicing on the correct input plug for the Atari machines, I saved all of them. I am really puzzled by the sudden demise of so many power supplies. I took one of them apart and didn't see anything that would indicate a short or something being burned out but then I am not much of an electrical detective anyway.

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???? these are center tapped transformer with a safety fuse... they last forever... so long as a person doesn't use them in some strange parallel wired configuration (ie feeding two drives with one brick or stranger still two pack in parallel... then you can run into heating issues that burn off the lacquer on the windings. Normally you would blow a fuse before that happens but if riding that line or using larger slower fuses, that's possible. You can unwind, re lacquer, and rewind the transformers though... so long as the copper isn't pitted or blasted apart.

I've already been lucky enough to have the burn out near the outside edge of winding of other transformers, just separated the contact point painted with lacquer and let dry... back to the races.. some folks fix and dip the whole thing to be sure no cracks exist after a repair or rewind.

In any event fuse replacement.. or outer winding fix is dead simple...

 

going all the way is tedious as a time consuming exercise...

Edited by _The Doctor__

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That is really weird. I have at least 12-15 PSUs and all are good. Maybe they weren't stored in the best conditions?

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Is it possible that there is a single Atari device you are using that is blowing the fuses in them. I had a 400 that blew two perfectly good 9VAC power supplies before I realized the 400's PWR board was shorting and blowing the 5AMP fastblow fuse in the PSU. No smoke of smell as the PSU is sealed and a blown fuse would not produce either. I only caught the second one going bad as within 30 seconds I noticed the red power LED start to get dim and then went out. The odds of 70% failure seems really high for it be natural attrition. There is probably something else going on you are not aware of. It could be one particular 1050 you have is killing them.

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its an A/C device so theres nothing sophisticated to go wrong.

can you open them up to examine internally?

i wonder if you have something amiss with your A/C source?

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The fuse was blown in the one I had cut open, so I cut another one open and found another blown fuse. I have been connecting everything to a power strip/surge protector and just turning off the power strip instead of turning off each device individually. Maybe that is blowing the fuses.

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not normally the case, though some folks worry about inductive kick damaging the devices themselves, some peeps used to have 'computer power centers', these usually consisted of power switches across the front, surge protection and choke pcb's in the case and the power outlets in the back. They protected from surges (some claimed lightning arresting or protection) and kick protection (chokes to soften the inrush current and kick)

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Sounds like you have a piece of hardware (1050, etc) that has an internal short and is blowing your fusses.

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you can get power strips with individually switched sockets - would that be advisable?

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How can I track down an internal short? The 1050 has given no indication of a problem.

If your 1050 works fine using a 9VAC brick and you can use it for hours, then the 1050 is likely not the problem. Look somewhere else. Basically, if my theory was right, there is a particular item (disk drive or computer), that when you plug a good 9VAC PSU into it, it stops working shortly thereafter (no pun intended).

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I recently bought a power supply that was advertised as a replacement for the 9VAC Atari power supply. I tested it and my two multimeters show 11.3 and 11.4 VAC. Is that acceptable or am I going to fry my computer/disk drive if I use it?

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You are reading the unloaded value without the transformers magnetic field fully involved plug it in and use the supply... it sounds correct- measure it again when connected with the device on and under load. Bet you it's much closer then. ;)

Edited by _The Doctor__

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It's all good. It is normal for the unloaded voltage to be a little high.

 

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What is the Amps or VA rating of your 3rd party power supply? Some sellers claim their 9VAC supplies are compatible with 810 and 1050 but are not because they are often 1amp. The original drives came with 3.4amp supplies, but need at least 2A if you're looking to replace it with a compatible one: http://atari.boards.net/post/19417

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it's listed, and the formula for volt amps to other units is posted in a similar discussion. In fact I'm probably the one who posted it... though today isn't a good recall day... if I remember I'll re-post or someone will find my post... it's

I(A) = S(VA) / V(V)

 

or 3.44444 amps

 

does that help?

 

so make it 3.5 amps and you're golden

Edited by _The Doctor__

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I meant to say that the transformer that I bought does not have an output amperage nor a VA listed. The only thing that it gives is the output voltage of 9-12 volts.  It is advertised as being a replacement for the C017945.

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need a little more to go on than that... pictures, a link to where it's come from etc... we have no idea who advertised it etc...

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https://www.walmart.com/ip/T-Power-for-9VAC-AC-Atari-CO17945-400-800-810-850-1010-1050-1200XL-Replacement-Ac-Dc-adapter-Switching-Power-supply-Cord-Charger/129729262

 

not this one above... it's only 1 amp, only for the lightest of Atari DC volt peripheral use. NOT an AC output! it's terribly wrong! at least according to the pictures, it lacks any real information in it's description

 

same thing is on Amazon as well

image.thumb.jpeg.c2dd62cd26f7c58e784fcb5bc4e724d9.jpeg

so... I wouldn't chance it, same on ebay...

 

this one needs more info... but might be ok for other things...

https://www.walmart.com/ip/T-Power-6-6-ft-Long-Cable-ATARI-PART-NO-CO-16353-101-MODEL-2600-XEP-80-SX212-CX-2600-DC9V-WBS-8943-Replacement-Ac-Dc-adapter-Switching-Power-supply-C/154143809

 

if it fits the jack it doesn't mean it's going to work...

time for the forum members to fact check the internet sellers and advise them... get the warnings out...

Edited by _The Doctor__

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17 minutes ago, _The Doctor__ said:

not this one above... it's only 1 amp

The 1A markings refer to the input current, the output current isn't stated. They are not necessarily the same, but output current is likely not very high due to lack of markings.

 

Here are the specifications for a 12VAC/5A power supply from All Electronics, notice the output current is about 8 times that of the input current.

I would have used a 9V supply as an example, but the highest current version they had was only 1A.

PHC# AC-125AC.
Input: 120VAC 60HZ 70VA.(~600mA)
Output: 12VAC 5A.

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5 hours ago, BillC said:

The 1A markings refer to the input current, the output current isn't stated. They are not necessarily the same, but output current is likely not very high due to lack of markings.

 

Here are the specifications for a 12VAC/5A power supply from All Electronics, notice the output current is about 8 times that of the input current.

I would have used a 9V supply as an example, but the highest current version they had was only 1A.

PHC# AC-125AC.
Input: 120VAC 60HZ 70VA.(~600mA)
Output: 12VAC 5A.

but it is worse than just that as the picture shows tip polarity as DC.... No way to trust the information you have to glean from the pictures and the vendor doesn't have the particulars listed anywhere... so I still recommend a pass on this one..

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