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Real life Atari or Blade Runner Atari?

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It must have been too long since I seen Blade Runner because what I remember about how that future looks is closer to my idea of a utopia instead of a dystopia. I do remember CRT's still being a thing so I guess yes.

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You should read Denis Villeneuve’s comments on why he wanted to feature Atari so prominently in 2049. It’s pretty interesting.

Would love to. Got any links for me? I couldn't really find anything. And yes, you'd get to fly Pan Am again.

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Would love to. Got any links for me? I couldn't really find anything. And yes, you'd get to fly Pan Am again.

I believe it was in a Rolling Stone interview, though it was summarized on E! where I read it. I could only find it in German on a search today, but will keep looking.

 

It’s interesting that Atari keeps popping up in dystopian/horror film these days: Blade Runner 2049; Stranger Things; Isle of Dogs (human protagonist Atari).

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It’s interesting that Atari keeps popping up in dystopian/horror film these days: Blade Runner 2049; Stranger Things; Isle of Dogs (human protagonist Atari).

 

...Ready Player One... (not a horror film but definitely a bit dystopian)

 

As for whether I'd want to live in the Blade Runner universe... hmm. Aside from obvious overcrowding in the cities (apparently still plenty of room in the country, if we consider the original theatrical release canon) and the possibility that replicants were considering going all Robotron 2049 on us (is that why the sequel chose that year?), we never really saw anything all that bad about living on that version of Earth. It seemed most people still had food, jobs and places to live, and whatever government corruption there may have been couldn't have been that much worse than what we have now. On the other hand, it is a neo-noir movie, and noir has a way of making rotten and seedy look attractive.

 

I suppose if I had the choice, I'd stay put where I am. But assuming I ended up living at least as well as the characters we saw in the movie -- maybe minus the people who actually made the replicants and ran the Voight-Kampff Tests -- I'd probably manage. Especially if there were still plenty of Atari games down at the arcade. :)

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I still have love for every atari device I've ever owned..

 

2600, 5200, 7800, 600 XL, 65 XE, 520 ST, 520STFM, Lynx...

My love for Atari as a company died years ago.

Atariage IS the real atari these days, in my opinion. The people the gather here, program games, create new hardware, and run the site (Albert,) have a love for atari that's probably only rivaled by the original programmers, designers, and engineers. As Flojomojo said...

 

 

 

My cold little heart is filled with rage against the current brand holder, "Atari SA," because they're greedy, incompetent, lawsuit-happy asswipes.

 

I couldn't have said it better myself.

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Were actually in the very year that the first Blade Runner takes place: 2019! Sadly, there are no flying cars, sexy replicants, or big neon Atari signs everywhere. But thankfully we also dont have robot Brion James running around on a murderous rampage! As to wether or not Id want to live in the fictional world of the movie under the assumption that Atari is still a global corporate presence... I really doubt it. Like many others here, I can only really think about Atari in the past tense. Nothing will ever be able to replace the many wonderful memories I have of growing up as an Atari kid, but thats what the brand is to me now, just a memory. And what a fantastic memory it is. But I do believe theres an alternate reality where the crash never happened and Atari is still vital and relevant and still producing amazing hardware and their magic never faded. Id love to visit this parallel timeline, but I dont think Id want to live there if it were in a dreary dystopian world like the Blade Runner universe. Although if 80s Sean Young was there waiting for me, Id have to seriously reconsider!

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I really don’t get much of a kick out of brand sentiment, though. Yeah, we get geek antidisestablishment points for promoting a dead company, but I use my A8 because it’s the best thing ever, and not because of the logo on it.

 

If we had to choose dystopias, though, original>2049, because it’d be fun to kick back with Zora and live in pedestrian-friendly megacities where buildings shoot giant flames and giant advertising blimps scream advertising in Japanese all day.

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Can't forget the year 1981 JCPenny. That box stacked up. It looked attracted. It would provide years of entertainment. I wished Atari was among the big players today. Probably they made another mistake with the Jaguar. In any case blade runner came at a great time. I love the 80's.

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Polybius exists in BR universe. Calling it.

Edited by Syzygy1
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Would love to. Got any links for me? I couldn't really find anything. And yes, you'd get to fly Pan Am again.

 

Here's part of an interview originally reported in Dazed:

 

The first movie takes place in 2019,” Villeneuve tells us. “There’s a gap of 30 years, and technology has evolved differently from our reality. So we created an alternate universe.” Basically, Blade Runner 2049 stays true to the original’s neo-noir tone and world, but Villeneuve has fast-forwarded to the inevitable collapse of society. Atari is still doing big business, and the environment is fucked. “The first movie was based on the idea of extending the 70s,” Villeneuve adds. “My movie is a projection from the first movie.”

 

 

Then there's this. But -- argh! -- I can't find the full interview in which he explains more completely why an Atari future is such a compelling one.

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Here's part of an interview originally reported in Dazed:

 

 

 

 

Then there's this. But -- argh! -- I can't find the full interview in which he explains more completely why an Atari future is such a compelling one.

Thanks for looking. I haven't been able to find anything better either. I did find the below from a telegraph.co.uk article that, while inaccurate about how far video games had gone before Atari went belly up, still made me laugh. I just copied and pasted below -

 

Atari and Pan Am were among the corporations hawking their cyber-wares via giant billboards in the first Blade Runner. This led to talk of a Blade Runner "curse" as both corporations had soon gone the way of Roy Batty in the drizzle. Out of fealty to its past, Blade Runner 2049 brings Atari back from the dead with a gleaming, building-size advertisement – suggesting a terrifying future where video games haven’t advanced beyond Pong.

 

If anybody wants to read the full article, here's the link - https://www.telegraph.co.uk/films/0/blade-runner-2049-callbacks-references-original-movie/

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I wouldn't mind running away with Sean Young, whether Atari is around or not.

 

Until you discover she is the Sean Young from "Ace Ventura"! :-o

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I believe in the Blade Runner future Atari had moved on to it's inevitable evolution of making toaster ovens and refrigerators. Maybe televisions too. Or in a real twist, their computers were adopted worldwide and they stopped making video games. Either way, with sex robots around, I doubt video games were a big business still.

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I believe in the Blade Runner future Atari had moved on to it's inevitable evolution of making toaster ovens and refrigerators. Maybe televisions too. Or in a real twist, their computers were adopted worldwide and they stopped making video games. Either way, with sex robots around, I doubt video games were a big business still.

So, The Federated Group's still around too?

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