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The apple II+ Is done. now the collecting begins.

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Well with the exception of the RFI keyboard. The apple II + based the Apple II diag. All it found was a memory chip that needed to be re-seated. The APPLE II super serial card I picked up worked like a champ to get the ADTPro software installed. First time in years I had to notch a disk. Got to love one side is bad on vintage disk. The other side is good. I would like to thank everybody for the help and I hope they enjoy the pictures.

 

Thank You,

 

Josh

appleIIdonemaybe0001.JPG

appleIIdonemaybe0002.JPG

appleIIdonemaybe0003.JPG

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I love that Zenith monitor!

 

I have several IIe's but I always wanted an original II and a II+.  Well, the II is simply out of my budget.  And, for the most part, the II+ is way too expensive.  So what I did was build me a II+ in pieces.  Last year or so, I bought a II+ motherboard that is in great condition.  Then, last spring, I found a II+ case that is near mint.  Beautiful condition with no yellowing that I can see.  Well, no more than the "yellowish-tan" color it normally is.

 

The missing piece was the PSU and keyboard.  Keyboards for the II+ can be very expensive when you find them separate.  So I got lucky.  I found a II+ on eBay that had a scratched up case and hole drilled into it for a reset.  I got it for $117 + S/H. 

 

I plan on rebuilding the PSU (or maybe get a modern PSU) and put in my original II+ motherboard in that beautiful case I have.  I don't think I really saved any money in the long run.  But this allowed me to get a near-mint II+ that works and spread the "payments" out.  🙂

 

Keyboard, PSU, 80-col card and Disk ][ controller = $117

Motherboard = $80

Case = $50

 

I can't remember what all the S/H was but probably another $75 for all.

 

So I'm at around $322 or so.  Which isn't too far off what a near-mint II+ costs.

 

Now, I have an Apple III monitor and a standard Apple IIe monitor that is color.  The III monitor looks awesome but is monochrome.  The IIe monitor is really bland if you think about it.  Compared to how beautiful the II line of computers are.  So I may just use my 1084S on it but that's sort of taboo sometimes.  LOL

 

Oh, I have the same disk drive and a similar printer.  An ImageWriter, IIRC.

 

I'm really thinking about building my own Mockingboard card using the prototype boards I have.  Really pays respect to the spirit of the Apple II line. 

 

Sorry to babble so much.  But you don't see as many people excited about their Apple II collections these days.

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On 10/3/2019 at 10:47 PM, cbmeeks said:

I love that Zenith monitor!

 

I have several IIe's but I always wanted an original II and a II+.  Well, the II is simply out of my budget.  And, for the most part, the II+ is way too expensive.  So what I did was build me a II+ in pieces.  Last year or so, I bought a II+ motherboard that is in great condition.  Then, last spring, I found a II+ case that is near mint.  Beautiful condition with no yellowing that I can see.  Well, no more than the "yellowish-tan" color it normally is.

 

Just a heads-up, I'm pretty sure all Apple II and II+ machines were painted that colour which is why you don't see them yellowed. Even the real early //e machines were painted, but they switched at some point fairly early on in the //e life cycle to using coloured moulded plastic which *does* yellow (as we all know too well!).

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On 10/3/2019 at 7:47 AM, cbmeeks said:

Sorry to babble so much.  But you don't see as many people excited about their Apple II collections these days.

 

Collecting to collect or for collecting's sake is beginning to slow down in the vintage gaming/computing sphere. I still have an extensive Apple II series collection of all kinds of stuffage, but in recent times I'm leaning more and more toward thinning it out. Reducing it back to what I had as a kid and little more.

 

Going from one wall-to-wall packed-full bedroom to a desktop or two and a rubbermaid tub or two is my goal.

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I've thought about thinning out my collection a little too (nearly 100 computers).  But I'm having a hard time actually doing it.

 

IIRC, I have 5-6 IIe's and a couple Platnum's.  If I sold anything, it might be one of those.

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23 hours ago, Keatah said:

Collecting to collect or for collecting's sake is beginning to slow down in the vintage gaming/computing sphere.

 

Thankfully.  I hope this means the return of sane prices across the board.

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I've been watching the amount of stuff for sale (Apple II) on ebay. And it's steadily risen from like 2000 items in 2015'ish to about 3200 present-day. The highest prices appear to be from antique shops. They see APPLE, they see $$$.

 

I am also pleased to see that the amount of die-hard collectors for Apple II has decreased. Many of them have transitioned into focus on preservation and simply enjoying the platform rather then hoarding everything.

 

At one time that superdrive interface card would command $600.00, and now I think there is one sitting there for 350 for a long time. Some of that has to do with modern hardware replacements outperforming the vintage stuff. Things like disk emulators and such. CFFA still commands $250-300 outside of a production run. But not the 500+ they used to.

 

As far as software, well, between TheInternetArchive and FTP ASIMOV there is Z-E-R-O need to pay anything near ebay prices. Besides, you want to work with disk images or freshly-written blank disks. Not ratbag stuff from 40 years ago. There's a few cranks there that'll sell original bagged floppies for 500% and more mark-ups. Because. Old. You know. So steer clear and happy computing!

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@cbmeeks  I can tell you what has helped, and is continuing to help, me thin out my stash* is both the discovery that our venerable old equipment is rather hardy and my ability to repair anything which fails has greatly improved.  I no longer need to hold onto four extra 1571 drives and C64 mainboards because I can fix them if they fail including more easily obtainable replacement or augmentation parts if needed.  Most of my TI equipment is built like a tank and very easy to fix.

 

Whatever I cannot fix or find the time to fix, I can quickly and easily find someone who has a working replacement or knows how to fix it.  For instance, Atari 800XLs and 1050 drives are not in short supply and there are more than a handful of people floating around AA who can fix them for us.

 

The Internet has largely helped facilitate this.  While not the first mode of contact it is certainly the most proliferate.  Even before social networking or AtariAge, I started connecting with people in news groups, local BBSes, etc.  We have access to the largest user groups ever with people who are always willing to help out, and the communities seem much more welcoming and not limited to the towered grey-beards.  Everyone wants to keep their various platforms alive and we constantly receive new blood which will ensure these legacies survive well into the future.  Even platforms for which the old order has passed on, the hacker spirit common to us all refuses to allow the machines to slip into eternity as someone or a small group of someones is compelled to revive interest.

 

It is quite an amazing thing to behold.

 

* I hate calling it a collection.  Collections are for butterflies and stamps which live on a shelf or remain in a display, taken down once in a while to admire and show, then put back away.  I use my machines, and when I can no longer use them or have experienced enough from them I want them passed on to the next person who will use and gain something from them.  I suppose having so much in reserve not being used could be another motivation to move them along.

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2 minutes ago, Keatah said:

There's a few cranks there that'll sell original bagged floppies for 500% and more mark-ups. Because. Old. You know. So steer clear and happy computing!

 

I like to work with the old floppies and cartridges whenever I can, with a simple rule: except under special circumstances, I will not pay more for an item today than what it sold for or listed for in catalogs of the era.

 

It seems silly, but my logic is the vast majority of these items are not appreciating assets and even rare items can be written to physical media from archival images.  I see the $20 of 1984 having the purchasing power of $50 today being a satisfactory depreciation in value for most items I buy.

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I may be generous and offer 5 or 10 bucks MORE than the official catalog/list price. A storage or finder's fee if you will. If I really want the item.

 

I think most Apple II+ and //e consoles are selling in the $150-$300 range. Slightly more if they are well equipped. This is depreciation because the consoles sold for $900-$2000 depending on era and options. I'm not going to play flunky for some eBay seller complaining they have a right to turn a profit. Go ahead. I ain't stopp'n ya! Too many eBayer's a full of self-entitlement.

 

And yes pretty much "anything computers" isn't an appreciating asset anyway no matter which way you look at it. For me the value of an old rig lies in it being sentimental. Making the journey with me and having been there when I was a kid and all that hogwash.

 

Like I would be uber-upset if my 486 soundcard blew up. I want the exact one I have now, the same one I had then. Not a replacement and definitely not a different make/model.

Edited by Keatah
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On 10/18/2019 at 4:06 PM, Keatah said:

What are the issues causing you to not do it?

 

That's a good question.  I guess I am more of a computer hoarder than I thought.  I have sold/donated stuff in the past but not that often.  I think one reason is that since I already own these computers, I feel a sort of "hardware wealth".  Not to brag...but more like stability.  Like, if my Apple II dies, I have several others so I'm covered.

 

Another reason is that the Apple II, Commodore 64, Amiga and TI all have a certain nostalgic feeling for me.  In different ways.  The TI was my first computer ever.  So I have an affinity for those machines.  The Commodore 64 was very special to me because it was bought by my mom and I enjoyed the most programming out of.  The Amiga was dear to me because it was the first computer I ever bought myself (worked an entire summer saving every penny during school).  The Apple II was the computer I wanted as a child because we had them in school but they were way too expensive.  So I can go on and on as to WHY I hang on to these things.  My head tells me I'm being irrational.

 

Another reason is that I sometimes feel the recipient of one of my computers wouldn't respect them the way I do.  It would tear me up to discover they were parted out for profit or used in some stupid YouTube video like that idiot kid that smashed a TI as click-bait.  Again, I'm being irrational.

 

It would certainly help to find someone...preferably someone local....that would actually use and enjoy one of my computers.  Several years ago, I almost gave one of my Amiga 500's away.  I worked with a guy much younger than me but he had discovered the Amiga and was fascinated by them.  He kept asking me questions about them and said he was looking for one.  Then, he was fired from work.  I didn't want to talk to him immediately after that (it's actually a policy here)...mainly because I knew he was probably stressed enough and/or embarrassed.  After more time went by, I figured he moved on.

 

 

On 10/18/2019 at 7:45 PM, OLD CS1 said:

@cbmeeks  I can tell you what has helped, and is continuing to help, me thin out my stash* is both the discovery that our venerable old equipment is rather hardy and my ability to repair anything which fails has greatly improved.  I no longer need to hold onto four extra 1571 drives and C64 mainboards because I can fix them if they fail including more easily obtainable replacement or augmentation parts if needed.  Most of my TI equipment is built like a tank and very easy to fix.

 

Whatever I cannot fix or find the time to fix, I can quickly and easily find someone who has a working replacement or knows how to fix it.  For instance, Atari 800XLs and 1050 drives are not in short supply and there are more than a handful of people floating around AA who can fix them for us.

 

That's a very good way to look at it.  I have also gotten MUCH better at repairing machines over the years.  And many parts can be substituted or found elsewhere.  There are a few exceptions, however.  Especially with Amiga's and Commodore 64's.  If you have a dead SID, your choices are limited.  You can get a modern replacement (SwinSID, etc.).  Which is certainly an option.  But I would hate to not have a real SID...because, well...SID.  Another option is to buy from eBay.  Assuming you get one that works, hell, you can pay more than a "dead C64" that probably has a working SID.  eBay scalpers are scum.  Finally, you can pull one from a "parts C64".  Preferably a C64 that was mostly dead already.  Same goes for Amiga parts.  Fortunately, Apple is a little easier to repair because much of the logic is plain TTL.  Unless you want to match date codes.  But I've never been that picky.

 

I will certainly think about thinning my collection out.  I may start with some of my lesser desirable machines.  Like my spare Mattel Aquarius.  🙂  Or, I have a spare Tandy 1000 EX that is missing a power cable that should be easy to repair.  Those are actually in demand.  Maybe my spare IIc or spare Platnum?

 

If I do, I will try forums first.  No way I'm selling on eBay.

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Don't get rid of your gear.

 

I was forced to do that some years back.  Basically, things were stolen from me during a forced move.  Was an ugly time.  

 

Fortunately, I was able to source new items from e-bay at the time, and the prices were not bad at all.  I got in just before the sharp increases really started to ramp up.  My //e Platinum was $50, for example.  A 6 switcher VCS was $20.  Atari 400, 800XL were both in the $30 range.  Color Computer 3 was the most money, $80.  

 

That's the part of my former collection I enjoy the most, so I'm happy, but for one little thing:  I plan on making some cards for the Apple, and don't want to blow a perfectly fine running //e Platinum, so I need a mainboard.  More $$$ today.  Also, scored a GS, and need a keyboard and mouse.  Getting that one up and running might suffice for my hardware activities too.

 

Point being, it's a pain in the arse, and I get the distinct feeling from here on out it's never going to be as easy nor cheap as it was the first go around.  And you never know...  For years, I jammed on Atari 8 bit machines hard.  Then, suddenly I just sort of stopped and the Apple 8 bit machines caught my attention.  I like them for different reasons.  And the CoCo comes and goes.  Love programming for the 6809.  

 

There were other things too.  My scope, various electronics bits and bobs.  Took quite a while to get setup again, and I still need a good bench power supply.  You just never know where this all goes.  

 

And when it goes somewhere that you used to have covered?  Painful.  

 

That's my 0.02

 

 

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I know what you mean.  I've had some stuff come up missing too. 

 

I've just about got everything stored in my new garage.  I think once I reorganize everything, I might be able to squeeze a little more in.  Then I've also got the attic.  But I'm hesitant to store stuff up there.  Especially during the long summers we have here.

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Yea. I ended up with a few things missing / thrown out throughout the years. The tough one was storing stuff in my dad's garage. Once I found a place I drove back and forth to pickup items / through stuff out. I had a small 4 door Suzuki sidekick. Fun trying to fit stuff in. Well one day I came back after a few months. Most of the stuff was gone. Not all of it. Seemed to be strange too. Chucked the stuff that was worth money or I was going to keep and left the stuff I was probably going to get ride of. I tried to explain to him if I known he wanted a quick decision. I would have come over and did a quick clean up. So it was things like. Had the container of Atari 2600 games I purchased used from yard sales and such as a kid in the 80's. But chucked the whole 2600 system. Left the CED video discs and got ride of the player. Etc, Etc. Interesting how life works.

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