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DASM

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DASM is a macro assembler that supports a variety of 8-bit microprocessors:

  • MOS 6502 & 6507
  • Motorola 6803, 68705 & 68HC11
  • Hitachi HD6303 (extended Motorola 6801)
  • Fairchild F8.


Here at AtariAge it's commonly used to develop programs for:

  • Atari 2600
  • Atari 5200
  • Atari 7800
  • Fairchild Channel F

 

Download the latest release from the DASM homepage

 

If you have any questions about using DASM post them in this Club.

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11 members, but will we get this going?

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6 hours ago, Thomas Jentzsch said:

11 members, but will we get this going?

 

Hi Thomas!! glad to see you here, I think that 10 members (not me included) are Masters in a Temple, colleting anwers this place will be an incredible reference in the net (google searches) for everybody wanting to know about dasm syntax. i did a reference to this forum at facebook too.

 

https://www.facebook.com/pg/DASM-Macro-Assembler-CLUB-100808128199075/posts/

 

cheers!!

Edited by zilog_z80a
adding url

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1 hour ago, zilog_z80a said:

 

Hi Thomas!! glad to see you here, I think that 10 members (not me included) are Masters in a Temple, colleting anwers this place will be an incredible reference in the net (google searches) for everybody wanting to know about dasm syntax. i did a reference to this forum at facebook too.

 

https://www.facebook.com/pg/DASM-Macro-Assembler-CLUB-100808128199075/posts/

 

cheers!!

 

collecting answers

 

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On 2/29/2020 at 9:23 AM, Thomas Jentzsch said:

11 members, but will we get this going?

 

Looks like we're going slowly but surely. What I'm trying to do at this point in time is to answer questions like this:

 

 

via the club

 

then answer the original question with a link to the answer in the club to get people familiar with coming here.

 

 

 

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On 2/22/2020 at 8:52 AM, SpiceWare said:

Here at AtariAge it's commonly used to develop programs for:

  • Atari 2600
  • Atari 7800
  • Fairchild Channel F

 

 

I use DASM for 5200 development.  Am I weird for doing so?

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1 hour ago, AverageSoftware said:

 

I use DASM for 5200 development.  Am I weird for doing so?

No, but the 5200 seems to be more obscure and not always included. I use DASM for 5200 / A8 too, what else would I use?

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I'd say it makes both of you weird, but I use that word as a complement. :D

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So I'm starting a new project.  Koffi:Yellow Kopter (2002) was programmed using old DASM V2.0 , I believe.   Adventure II 5200 and XE were started using TASM by Alan Davis,  so I kept using that assembler.  Didn't seem to cause any problems vs DASM.   And I used the simple original Notepad.      But for my new project, I've been investigating newer tools.  I want to keep concurrent 5200 and A8 versions of the game, which is something new to me as others like Tep392 and Debro have helped me with the 5200-to-A8 conversions in the past. 

 

I downloaded DASM V2.20.13 which seems to be the newest.   I see that there are several other windows tools out there, but I think I'll stay old-school for now and just code in text file using Notepad or Notepad++.    

 

Any suggestions to make development quicker or simpler by using another dev tool along with DASM?    I'm actually fine coding just using the text file, then compile in a command prompt, then run it in Altirra to test, but maybe there is a better way. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

I am using TextPad with syntax highlighting and executing DASM directly from within the editor. Last not least it can read the error output and jump to the error line. 

 

I suppose Notepadd++ could be setup similar. Which saves a lot of time.

Edited by Thomas Jentzsch

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29 minutes ago, Thomas Jentzsch said:

I am using TextPad with syntax highlighting and executing DASM directly from within the editor. Last not least it can read the error output and jump to the error line. 

 

Executing DASM directly in the editor and jumping to the error line is a pretty awesome upgrade from what I'm used to. 

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I use Visual Studio Code with Atari Dev Studio installed.

It, too, allows building/running from within the editor. It has code/syntax highlighting as well.

I don't think it has "jump to error" yet, but it does have the advantage of being very actively developed by a member of our community.

 

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14 hours ago, Andrew Davie said:

I don't think it has "jump to error" yet...

Please let me know when that happens. Then I will consider switching.

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I'm using jEdit. Have it set it up to compile with dasm and run the results via an emulator. I've built syntax highlight rules for 6502 opcodes and 2600 registers, can easily add other system registers as well.  

 

Screen Shot 2019-12-15 at 11.00.28 AM.png

 

 

I also found a way to colorize binary values so that graphics in your code are very obvious:

 

Screen Shot 2019-12-15 at 11.40.43 AM.png

 

 

 

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